Technology

The Importance of Being a Connected Educator

This is a new blog that I posted on my Rethinking Education blog.  I thought I would share it with you.  Enjoy the week!
Vic

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The Commodore 64

Back in the early 1990’s, I was working on my master thesis for graduate school in music.  During this time, the personal computer was really taking shape and was still pricey for the times.  I remember our first PC.  I was working on my thesis and begged my husband to purchase one for the house.  He kept saying to me, “All you want to do is chat on AOL.”  That was not quite the reason why as you know, to write a thesis, like a dissertation, it was much easier to use Microsoft Word and use the program’s ability to create footnotes at the bottom of the page.  (I cannot fathom how folks did it before computers!)

At the time, the only service we could get was dial-up.  You heard that distinct dial tone and the crunching of sounds, trying to hook up through a web service such as AOL, Earthlink or Prodigy.  Your monthly fee would enable dial-up service, email, news, and a search engine to surf the world wide web.  I remember having the ability to chat using the AOL protocol, but never really used it as not many folks had personal computers.

Enter the 21st century.  Now, we use social media like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Blogs to connect.  But why is this so important for us as educators and administrators to use these tools?  You say to yourself, “But I don’t want people to find out what I am doing and have my information on the web. Or, Twitter?  Really, as a professional development tool?”  You bet, and the best part, it’s all FREE!!

The platforms that I identified, I use to increase what we call, a PLN (Personal/Professional Learning Network).  This means connecting to like minded folks who are passionate about education and discussing what is best for students.  For me personally, using Twitter as a professional development tool has rejuvenated my career and connected me to some “Rock Stars” in my PLN.  There are times I am chatting with my New York friends about good practice and other times chatting with Rockstar educators such as Todd Whitaker, Peter DeWitt and even Arne Duncan.  The best part that I cannot stress enough is that it is free.  It also gets me off of “the lonely island of administration.”  If I have a problem that I don’t have an answer too, it’s very easy to “dial-up” my PLN and in less than an hour, I get a response to my question.  Need a little mentorship, tweet out to your PLN and instantly, they come to your rescue because they are connected.  Want to meet your PLN?  Go to some conferences like the SAANYS, NASSP, NAESP, NYSCATE and ISTE conference and participate in a Tweet-up.  Better yet, go to an Edcamp, free learning, face-to-face and live tweeting.

To  open an account with Twitter is easy.  You go to the website and join and the program will pull you through the steps and voila, you have a username.  Use a unique username, something that identifies who you are.  My twitter handle is  @VictoriaL_Day, makes sense because that is my name and it identifies that it is me.  I also uploaded a picture as well as explaining who I am in the biography slot.  Once you have opened an account, follow someone, like me.  See who they are following and who follows them.

Twitter is not like Facebook.  You only have 140 characters to write what you are thinking or answer a question or provide a link to an article or a blog.  You do have to remember that this is Social Media (SM) but a rule of thumb is this, anything you post whether it’s on Twitter, Facebook or a blog or a comment on a blog is a digital footprint.  Just think of it this way, do I want my parents of students, staff and my family reading this, then you will be safe.  Also, be kind – it is okay to agree to disagree in chats, but we are here to learn.

The thing we Twitter aficionados say to do for beginner tweeps is once you join, start lurking.  Start lurking  on various chats and tweeps that you follow.  Join a chat using a hashtag.  The hashtag is the hash symbol # with the word or term used after the symbol.  It groups all tweets into one stream or group that you can follow.  For instance, I co-moderate, with Tony Sinanis, Bill Brennan, Blanca Duarte, Carol Varsalona and Starr Stackstein,  #NYEDChat every other Monday at 8:30p.m. EST.  You can easily join our chat’s on Monday evenings, lurk and see our conversation.  Another powerful chat to follow is #satchat every Saturday at 7:30a.m. The moderation team of Scott Rocco, Billy Krakower and Brad Curie started a revolution about two years ago and it has taken off so fast that they had to open chats on the west coast (#satchatwc) and expanded to Oceania (#satchatoc).  I remember it was just a few of us starting the global conversation, and then it took off like wildfire. It is so hard to keep up with the chat because people are tweeting is so fast.

So, I challenge you to open yourself and get connected, whether it’s Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Pinterest, etc.  Start lurking.  Follow us on our chats and watch how your PLN will start to grow.  Once you start, I promise, you will be hooked.  It will rejuvenate your career!

Other News
  • Bus Duty for Mar 10 – Mar 21  Team 3:  Jessica Serviss and Teresa Kiechle.  Upcoming bus duty:  Mar. 24 – Apr. 4  Team 4:  Jennifer Prevost, Marci Woods, Kathy Buell
  • I will be continuing with walk through’s , especially at the 3-5 level and finishing focusing on staff that will be involved with NYS testing first.
  • 3-5 teachers involved with NYS Testing and for all, April 1st, 2nd and 3rd are the first testing dates for ELA.  Math is April 30th, May 1st and May 2nd. Teacher directions have been placed in your mailboxes.  Please review this and highlight things you need to know to prepare your room.  For everyone, please highlight these dates as we will be busy administering the test and special schedules may be swapped.  More information to follow!
Things in the Twittersphere
  • What are the five things you are grateful for?  Make a list daily.  It does wonders!
  • Be the change agent for kids!  Be a champion for kids.  Every kid deserves a champion!
App of the Week
Flipboard is an app that captures t, discovers, collects and shares the news you care about.  It can be from many different publications, as well as follow your social media feeds.  You can catch the latest technology news, follow the New York Times, CNN, or one of your favorite magazines that shares there articles on the service.  The best part, it’s FREE!!  You know I like free.  Flipboard is available in the iTunes store, Google Play, Windows Store, BlackBerry World.  If you are a news junky, this is one of the apps you want.
Other Items of Interest

Share My Lesson has a virtual conference set for March 11-13, in the evening, so teachers can participate. There are dozens of webinars to choose from.

The results of a survey about homework indicate that students are asked to do a lot of homework, perhaps too much? Do you talk about homework, the amount and its purpose, in your school?

This publicly available article from Educational Leadership describes how to use polling to gather data and provide feedback in real time.

Managing your project well is critical to a successful project – here are some tips .

Learn about one school’s transition to Project Based Learning. At this high school, more than 30 classes are being redesigned. Wow!

When creating a bully-free environment, rules and regulations are insufficient. The underlying climate can be influenced by deliberate efforts to increase the emotional intelligence of the school. One such approach, known as RULER, has proved effective.

Here’s some information about 3-8 testing:

Here are some suggestions for small schools and singletons working to be Professional Learning Communities (PLC).

Here are mentoring resources for March from Just ASK Publications, including the monthly mentoring calendar.

The College Board has announced major changes to the SAT.

If you are looking to make good rubrics and to make rubrics work better for you and your students, this is a great resource.

This column and infographic explain how you can use color to your advantage in the classroom.

Read about how one teacher makes sure that all children in her classroom belong. In a way, she employs pedagogical and assessment strategies to make sure.

A Touch of Humor
Close to Home

Some Youtube Favs.

(I thought I would do a fun post today, something not so serious, but related to education and technology. I stole this idea from my friend, Lisa Meade, Corinth Middle School principal.  Have to give her credit!)
It is the age of technology and YouTube has dominated much of our kids lives, no less maybe with some of ours.  Streaming videos, whether on AppleTV, YouTube, Vimeo, Netflix, Hulu, or Amazon.com can be even cheaper than paying that cable or satellite bill.  Even some network stations stream their series, FREE, on their website.  Sometimes I wonder why I spend so much money on Dish Network.  (I love the movies though!)
Anyway, I digress.  One of the neat things about YouTube is that you can share them and favorite them.  Also, you can use some of these videos to help instruction, like Khan Academy, or what would be even more powerful, if you flip your lessons.  Better yet, how about getting our kids to make some videos.  Yes, we need to monitor, but how powerful would that be for our kids.
Anyway, the purpose of this is to share my favorites on YouTube.  They are appropriate and share a glimpse into what influences me.  Some are related to school, some funny, some inspiring.  You can check some of my favorites here.  What are some of your favs?  Have a great week!
Vic
Other News
  • Bus Duty for Feb 24-Mar 7 Team 2:  Mindy Backus, Pam Mahay, Denise Croasdiale.  Upcoming bus duty:  Mar 10 – Mar 21:  Team 3:  Jessica Serviss, Teresa Kiechle
  • Our Staff Meeting is tomorrow, March 3rd @ 2:45pm in room 31
  • Thanks to folks who helped out at our AR Night and Hoe Down.  Both events were awesome!
  • Congrats to our OotM Teams.  We did well this weekend.  Thanks Steph for organizing it!
  • In speaking with Donna, we will probably cancel the Tech Meeting scheduled this week.  Look for notification.
  • I will be starting up walk through’s again, especially at the 3-5 level and finishing focusing on staff that will be involved with NYS testing first.
  • 3-5 teachers involved with NYS Testing and for all, April 1st, 2nd and 3rd are the first testing dates for ELA.  Math is April 30th, May 1st and May 2nd. Teacher directions have been placed in your mailboxes.  Please review this and highlight things you need to know to prepare your room.  For everyone, please highlight these dates as we will be busy administering the test and special schedules may be swapped.  More information to follow!
Things in the Blogsphere
Things in the Twittersphere
  • What are the five things you are grateful for?  Make a list daily.  It does wonders!
  • Be the change agent for kids!  Be a champion for kids.  Every kid deserves a champion!
Other Items of Interest
imageTake the “Education Roadtripofpublic opinion about education across the country. Opinions about different topics are reported, including the Common Core. Interestingly, 66% of Americans strongly support uniform standards but just 31% report supporting the Common Core. Maybe we need to communicate with the 58% surveyed who said that they didn’t know what the Common Core was!

SED has updated the diploma requirements pamphlet to reflect the change to the Regents with Advanced Designation Diploma.

Image
Hold your horses! Many textbooks are still not Common Core-aligned. A studyof ”new” textbooks indicates that they aren’t “new” after all.

SED has updated the math “double-testing” memorandum now that it has been approved.

A different memo explains the impact of the Regents changes to Common Core implementation. There aren’t many.

Google news is back – and it’s easier to use. Students can check out primary source materials throughout the world and much of recorded (newspaper printed) history.

A recently completed meta-analysis suggests that girls do not do better in single-sex schools or classes. Single-sex classrooms do not impact math, science, or self-esteem according to the researchers.

Here are developmentally appropriate versions of presentation rubrics. They are even aligned to the Common Core ELA Standards. It is said that in a New Tech High School students will present at least 100 times. How often do students present in your school? Do we provide them with adequate opportunity and feedback to get good at it?
A good project depends on an authentic audience. Here are some things to think about.

Better standardized test scores does not translate to better cognitive ability. While these two ideas are correlated, the relationship is one-sided: cognitive skills impact standardized tests but not the other way around.

Here’s a quick primer about Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS).

This review of literature about class sizes concludes that class size does make a difference.

Flipped

These tips can help with the flipped classroom. Yes, the video is important, but what goes on in class is more important.

An upcoming [free] webinar will address the relationship between physical activity at school and academic achievement. It’s March 20th at 9a.

A Touch of Humor